How Far Have We Come In Treating Depression?

Treating Depression with Ketamine

Depression in humans has always been a part of humankind. Healers, writers, and philosophers had each agreed throughout the ages that depression not only existed, but was either a physical or mental struggle for people the world over. Yet, they themselves had had their own struggles during those experiential times. “How does one heal another with depression correctly without full comprehension of its complexities?” Today, we may be closer than ever. But first, let’s take a look at the past:

Timeline

5th century B.C.: Hippocrates believed that the body was made up of too much “black bile,” secreted by the spleen. Depression, (melancholia), was absolutely a physical ailment. However, Greek and Roman literature of the time was filled with references to mental illness caused by spirits or demons.

1600’s: Neurologist Thomas Willis, was an early forerunner of present day neuropsychiatry and philosopher of the mind. He was a pioneer in researching the anatomy of the brain, nervous system and muscles. Willis believed that depression was not a possessed spirit, but rooted in the brain. Unfortunately, his enlightenment did not improve his treatment of patients, advocating in some cases to hit the patient over the head with sticks.

The 18th and early 19th centuries:
It was thought that depression was an inherited, unchangeable weakness of temperament. People should be shunned or locked up. As a result, most people with mental illnesses became homeless and poor and some were committed to institutions.

Early 19th century: New therapies for depression included water immersion (without drowning the patients) and a special spinning stool to induce dizziness (to rearrange the contents of the brain into the correct positions). Horseback riding, special diets, enemas and vomiting were also recommended therapy.

1938: Electroconvulsive therapy was thought to be the only effective modern treatment for depression, but the procedure sometimes caused memory loss, among other side effects.

1952: Doctors noticed that a tuberculosis medication (isoniazid) was also useful in treating people with depression. Shortly after, the practice of using medications to treat mental illness gained full steam.

1987: Eli Lilly released the first antidepressant drug, Prozac. It was an immediate hit. In just three years, two million people around the world were taking it and pharmaceutical companies began churning out their own only slightly different versions of the drug soon after.

Today: It has become the norm that multiple professions and approaches to treatment have important roles to play in helping people overcome depression.

An Astounding Treatment for Today

Ketamine, which began in the operating room over fifty years ago, has been repurposed. Today, it is being used by physicians at Michigan Pain Clinic for the treatment of chronic pain and mood disorders. The treatment is called Ketamine Infusion Therapy.

According to Dr. Mark Gostine, MD, President of Michigan Pain Clinic, the over four thousand patients they’ve treated with Ketamine have seen significant results. “What we have found is that Ketamine Infusion Therapy is very useful for both depression and chronic pain sufferers. It is very good for mood disorders such as depression, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Bi-Polar disorders, and there’s even been some indication that it may be useful for Autism. The overall best success in using Ketamine Infusion Therapy is to treat patients who have both pain and depression. Chronic pain frequently causes depression. If you only treat the pain and not the depression you are not going to get as good of an overall result than if you can treat both.”

Contact Michigan Pain Consultants Today

Exciting medical breakthroughs such as these continue to keep Michigan Pain Consultants at the forefront of providing effective pain management programs in the West Michigan area.
Make an appointment for a new patient consultation with one of their board certified pain physicians. All of Michigan Pain Consultant’s physicians are Board Certified in Anesthesiology or Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and have advanced training and experience in Pain Medicine. You can begin first by visiting online at MyLifeBeyondPain.com, MichiganPain.com, or by calling them at (800)281-3237.

With six locations throughout West Michigan, Michigan Pain Consultants comprehensive interdisciplinary approach to pain care offers patients and providers renewed hope for relief from chronic pain. Chronic pain should be treated like other chronic medical conditions such as diabetes, asthma, or congestive heart failure. Chronic pain requires chronic treatment. The goal of the treatment is to optimize the management of the pain, as opposed to curing the pain.

Let’s Talk About Chronic Pelvic Pain

Chronic Pelvic Pain

I’ve Heard About Chronic Pelvic Pain. Do I Have It?

Ever get that sense that while you’ve been experiencing real, honest pain in your pelvic region, no one believes you? You know…that area that’s somewhere in between your belly button and your hip area? They tell you that since the severity of it comes and goes, perhaps you’re not eating right. Or it’s just another bad menstrual period. They don’t get it. Others tell you to visit your doctor, which you have done, but your doctor hasn’t quite exactly figured out where your pain is coming from either. And that’s not necessarily their fault since chronic pelvic pain is somewhat of a mystery to many.

There Is an Answer

In the meantime you’re genuinely trying to cope with it all on a daily basis…and definitely feeling real pain and discomfort. Perhaps you’ve even gone into the depression-zone over it. You’ve Googled it and even went to the library to figure it all out on your own. Waste of time? Maybe. But, after having dealt with this uncomfortable and agonizing condition for many months, you’ve decided to visit someone who specializes in diagnosing and treating women’s pelvic pain. Good for you. Welcome to Michigan Pain Consultants and the office of Dr.Bindu Popat-Lewis.
Chronic Pelvic Pain (CPP) is a common problem and presents a major challenge to health care providers because of its unclear etiology, complex natural history, and poor response to therapy. Chronic pelvic pain can be misunderstood and also be poorly managed. The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG) defines chronic pelvic pain (CPP) as continuous or noncyclical pelvic pain of longer than 6 months duration that localizes to the anatomic pelvis, abdominal wall at or below the umbilicus, lumbosacral back, or the buttocks and is of sufficient severity to cause functional disability or lead to medical care.

My Symptoms?

However, even if some of the following symptoms you’ve been experiencing over the past six months are: Lower abdominal pain, pain during or after sex, pain with sitting, tailbone or lower back pain, genital pain, frequent and/or painful urination, depression and/or anxiety regarding your pain you should visit Dr. Popat-Lewis who uses a multidisciplinary approach to diagnosing and treating Chronic Pelvic Pain.

Who Is Dr. Popat-Lewis?

Dr. Popat-Lewis earned her Bachelor of Health Science from Oakland University and Master of Physical Therapy degrees from Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan. She practiced physical therapy for 10 years at the William Clay Ford Center for Athletic Medicine Henry Ford Health System, and William Beaumont Hospital. Dr. Popat-Lewis received her D.O. at the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine. She completed her residency in Anesthesiology and AOA-accredited fellowship in Acute and Chronic Pain Management at McLaren Hospital of Greater Lansing. She is trained and experienced in the latest interventional pain management techniques including spinal cord stimulation. She is board certified in Anesthesiology and Acute and Chronic Pain Management. Her special interests include musculoskeletal dysfunction, unresolved acute and chronic spine pain, pelvic pain and women’s health. And, she’s a pain physician with Michigan Pain Consultans.

So What Does CPP Mean To You?

You feel absolutely awful in that area of your body, you can’t exactly explain it, have been feeling this way for a long time, and want help today. Period. That’s what CPP (Chronic Pelvic Pain) means to you. Dr. Popat-Lewis understands. It’s time to begin enjoying your life beyond pain.

Contact Michigan Pain Consultants Today

Exciting medical breakthroughs such as these continue to keep Michigan Pain Consultants at the forefront of providing effective pain management programs in the West Michigan area.
Make an appointment for a new patient consultation with one of their board certified pain physicians. All of Michigan Pain Consultant’s physicians are Board Certified in Anesthesiology or Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and have advanced training and experience in Pain Medicine. You can begin first by visiting online at MyLifeBeyondPain.com, MichiganPain.com, or by calling them at (800) 281-3237.

With six locations throughout West Michigan, Michigan Pain Consultants comprehensive interdisciplinary approach to pain care offers patients and providers renewed hope for relief from chronic pain. Chronic pain should be treated like other chronic medical conditions such as diabetes, asthma, or congestive heart failure. Chronic pain requires chronic treatment. The goal of the treatment is to optimize the management of the pain, as opposed to curing the pain.

Regenerative Medicine

Dr. Eric Kozfkay of Michigan Pain Consultants recently spoke on the topic of Regenerative Medicine at a public seminar on the campus of Metro Health in Wyoming, Michigan. In the event you were unable to be in attendance, we are please to be able to provided this video Dr. Kozfkay’s full presentation.